MUSIC

These works are composed with materials captured from the human and natural world, seeking to explore the beauty in everyday objects.

Recording and studio technologies have been used to take materials from their original context and through processes of montage and transformation works have been created which explore sound.

HearThisSpace @ Phoenix Square

These works have been variously developed for multichannel diffusion performance, stereo and headphone (binaural) playback and site sensitive installation.

Acousmatic Music (sound based)

Acousmatic works are purely sound based and make use of the possibilities of editing, manipulation and montage, afforded by recording technologies.

Stille Lyd (2013/2014)

In the winter of 2013/14 Andrew Hill travelled to the Norwegian Centre for Technology in Music and the Arts (NOTAM) to work with their composers and technicians in the development of electroacoustic works around the theme of “Quiet”.

Two works were premiered in March 2014.

   

This project was supported by the British Council and Arts Council England, NOTAM and Production Network for Electronic Art (PNEK).

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The full project blog contains detailed information about the project and the development of works, click here.

Abstracted Journeys (2013)

This piece was commissioned by the Music, Technology and Innovation Research Centre as part of the Compose With Sounds project. It was premiered on the Acousmonium as part of the GRM Akousma festival, January 2013.

The work was composed from a library of recordings made in external locations around Liverpool and Leicester and seeks to explore the sonic textures present within these recorded sounds.

Quaff (2012)

This piece was composed from binaural recordings for a special concert of Binaural works at Phoenix Square Digital Media Centre (10th November 2012).

Quaff (v): To drink heartily (usually of an intoxicating beverage).

Re-enlivening the Archaic (2012)

This piece was composed as part of a collaboration with Stella Karageorgi, for her exhibition Re-enlivening the Archaic inspired by ancient Cypriot artwork.

The work uses recordings from Cyprus and of the Ney flute (an ancient Middle Eastern Instrument) in an attempt to connect and transport the listeners to the ancient island.

Vox Loop_a (2011-2012)

This work was composed from audio recordings of the voice (provided, unknowingly at the time of recording, by Motje Wolf).

The sound of the human voice makes a very strong connection with us as listeners and is, perhaps, the most diverse musical instrument that exists. This piece was inspired by the works of two of my favourite composers, Trevor Wishart and Luciano Berio.

OhLLandy (2012)

A surprise birthday present for Leigh Landy. Performed at Cultural Exchanges 2012 (DMU) to celebrate his 60th birthday.

This piece is composed entirely from recordings of Leigh Landy in rehearsal and excerpts and clips from his own works. It is based upon his 'radio' series of works: Oh La La Radio, To BBC or Not and Radio Aktiv.

Simon Emmerson Concert Introduction (2011)

A birthday celebratory work for Simon Emmerson's 60th Birthday. Utilising samples of Simon's own work and his inimitable concert introductions.

Visual Music (sound and image)

The desire to combine sound and image in a multi-sensory art form has fascinated and transfixed artists and philosophers for centuries. Visual Music works make use of both sounds and images in the construction of a musically informed audio-visual expression.

Perpetual Motion (2011)

This work was inspired by and developed exclusively from materials collected in the Paternoster lift at the Attenborough tower, Leicester. The paternoster lift itself is in constant motion, the open compartments slide slowly between floors in a never ending loop, rising and falling, passing constantly in a seamless flow of perpetual motion.

Perpetual Motion (revised version) from Andrew Hill on Vimeo.

Phase (2009)

This work is inspired by the concept of transformation in a thermodynamic system, from one state of matter to another.

It uses colour and texture to evoke the complex interaction of energy and matter as they combine, react and transmute.

Phase from Andrew Hill on Vimeo.

Decomposing the Light (2008)

"I open my eyes to the light, and see at first only a maze of light and colour. I touch, I move forwards, I touch again, and as I look the chaos insensibly clears. Touch in some way decomposes the light, separates the colours, distributes among the objects, and detatches a clear space. Touch opens before my eyes a certain distance, and shows them the way by which they may look over the far earth, and rise even to the heavens above. Touch unfurls for them the universe."

Condillac Treatise On The Sensations (1735)

Decomposing The Light (2008) from Andrew Hill on Vimeo.

This piece exists in four sections:

1. Unseen space,

2. I open my eyes to the light,

3. Touch,

4. Among the objects.

Flux (2008)

An audiovisual piece inspired by cyclic patterns, exploring sound and image relationships.

Flux from Andrew Hill on Vimeo.

Performance (live)

While Andrew's main focus is studio based composition he also performs live with electronic instruments and has been a member of the Dirty Electronics Ensemble (DEE) since 2008. He has performed with the DEE across the UK and made a number of documentary films about their activities.

Kurzwellen Performance

Though studio based works exist in a fixed form they can be performed live across multichannel diffusion systems. Andrew has performed his works on systems in Europe and across the UK, including the Acousmonium (GRM, Paris), Zirkonium (ZKM, Karlsruhe), MANTIS (University of Manchester), Soundings Festival (University of Edinburgh), Electroacoustic Wales (Bangor University), Sound Festival (University of Aberdeen) and the MTIRC concert system (De Montfort University) among others.

He is a member of HEAR TH↓S SPACE, a collective of composers who facilitate site sensitive concerts in unique venues. Curating works and assembling speaker systems that are appropriate for the chosen spaces.